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Types of stoves

Types of stoves and their functions

1. The basic stove …

… is a thermal storage heating stove, the oldest known way of constructing tiled stoves. The fire system consists of high-quality fire clay material. The hot flue gas generated by the burning process is led through ceramic heat-exchange channels, in order to extract the maximum amount of heat and to store this in the ceramic surfaces. The heat is released slowly from the fireclay material to the stove surfaces and is given off at a steady rate into the room. The proportion of healthy, pleasant radiant heat given off by the basic stove is particularly high.

2. The Combi Stove …

… combines the advantages of the basic stove with the warm air thermal heating tiled stove. On leaving the heating element, the flue gases are led into masonry flue channels and there they release the heat into the fire clay and consequently, into the stove tiles. The heat from the heating element can be directed through a hot air circulation system directly into the living space or it can be temporarily stored by means of an adjustable air grille in the tiled casing. In this way the proportion of radiant heat is increased and the proportion of hot air reduced.

3. The warm air thermal heating tiled stove …

… releases perceptible amounts of heated air into the room a few minutes after being lit. The stove construction consists of an industrially manufactured heating element and connected heating channels made from steel or cast iron and in some cases a fire clay lining to increase the storage effect. In the heating chamber, between the heating element, the hot gas channel and the tiled casing, the ambient air of the room is heated. It is led through vent tiles or air grilles into the living space and ensures rapid, steady heating of adjoining living areas. By means of hot air and return air channels the stove can also be used to heat several rooms divided off from one another.

4. The tiled stove and fireplace …

… is an auxiliary heating system, which gives a view of the open fire. In fireplace stoves, the heat is retained longer and is more efficiently used than in an open fireplace. The fireplace stove consists of a fireplace section with a viewing window, in which the combustion chamber is located. This is surrounded by an air jacket. The ambient air of the room at the heating surfaces is heated in this air jacket. Once the air has released heat into the room, it flows back, to be heated again. The fire can be seen through the vision panel and this creates a pleasant atmosphere in the room. Heat is released rapidly and for this reason the fireplace stove is ideal as an auxiliary heating system. Some of the heat is indirectly released as radiant heat via the tiled surface. Moreover, some stove systems offer the possibility of attaching ceramic heat-exchange channels. This increases the proportion of radiant and stored heat.